Hillary Clinton Speaks on Ferguson, Says Inequality a Bunch of Times

By IAfrica
In World News
Aug 29th, 2014
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Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.

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After touring working class neighborhoods in the Hamptons to push copies of her failed second biography, Hillary Clinton finally mulled over what to say about Ferguson and said nothing.

And by nothing, I mean that she said every possible conceivable thing so that everything was canceled out leaving nothing. Also she used the word “equality” a lot.

“We can do better. We cannot ignore the inequalities that exist in our justice system, inequalities that undermine our most deeply held values of fairness and equality,” Clinton said during a speech in San Francisco.

Inequalities that undermine our values of equality. Someone in Clintonworld is a real wordsmith.

Other repetitive phrases that Hillary repetitively repeated included “Bonds of trust”.

“We can do better. We can work to rebuild the bonds of trust from the ground up,” Clinton said, adopting a careful, general tone that avoided casting blame on anyone.

“This is what happens when the bonds of trust and respect that hold any community together fray,” Clinton said.

This speech just feels like someone’s copy and paste function got out of control. We’re lucky that Hillary didn’t spend the entire speech talking about the importance of Lorem Ipsum to race relations.

The speech, like Hard Choices, is another reminder that Hillary Clinton won’t utter a single spontaneous phrase orexpress what she genuinely feels about something. She’s hoping that her road to the White House will be paved by being utterly uncontroversial.


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