“N Word”: Egyptian Paper Warns of “Black Terror Gangs in Cairo”

By IAfrica
In World News
Aug 28th, 2014
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Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.

muslim racism

No matter how much white liberals agonize about white racism, the Muslim world is roughly a million times more racist than an entire Neo-Nazi town in Idaho after its cable package was reduced to just BET.

Youm7 aka The Seventh Day is a major Egyptian paper. It has the most visited website and its English edition, the Cairo Post, is considered reasonably respected.

This has stirred up controversy mainly thanks to Twitter.

The editor of Youm7 was today facing calls to quit after the newspaper published an article referring to black immigrant youths – as “n*ggers.” The sickening slur appeared in a massive headline letters above an article claiming to tackle the issue of so-called ‘black’ gangs in Cairo.

Gangs of African migrants are indeed an issue in Cairo, not to mention Israel. While Israel has been attacked for deporting African migrants, Egypt is responding a whole lot worse to their presence.

It was on Saturday, late in the evening, when a group of “Lost Boys” and “Lost Girls” gang members took to the streets of Cairo armed with machetes, pangas and knives in the realm and characteristic manner of what they call “rob and slaughter” to ostensibly make a living due to the scarcity of jobs and constant exposition to racism in Egypt.

Instead, hundreds of Southern Sudanese youths are willing to either live the dangerous gangster-ism or take the risky trip to Israel for the sake of a more affluent life.

Last Saturday’s gangs raids were the deadliest of all and among the casualties were Mr. Dhal Noy Dhal of Awiel State and a student of St. Andrew’s School, and Mr. Juma of Central Equatoria, who were seriously hacked with Machetes all over their bodies and are now under intensive care in one of the Egyptian hospitals.

The above same group had also in the morning just outside the office gate attacked an Egyptian Journalist lady working in the GoSS Consulate in Cairo, where she sustained minor injuries and also she lost her jewelry and some cash to the attackers. This is not the first time they are targeting staff in the consulate— it has been a routine, anyway.

The situation is also pretty bad in parts of Tel Aviv.

Tiger speaks Hebrew peppered pretty good English and a little Arabic. He’s single, 30 years old, and he won his nickname because he is very flexible. Tiger works locally as a soldier in a criminal organization in southern Tel Aviv, one of three organized criminal gangs. “If I do not robbing or stealing, I’m dead,” he says. “Just that I’m alive.’s Something I have to do to make me how to buy food and pay rent. No job and the best I can do.”

“In Sudan.  if you have no money you starving.,then what do we do? Steal, thieves and murderers is part of our life.”

It may surprise white liberals to realize that the same issues in America are largely replicated across the rest of the world.

Clad in silky tank tops, trainers and baseball caps, the Lost Boys, Outlaws and other gangs base their loyalties not on tribe or religion, but on territorial claims to areas of the Cairo.

Members are usually in their late teens or twenties, love rap music, often live together in shared flats and socialise at parties and picnics.

But they also rob fellow Sudanese, attack other gangs and beat up youths in their area who refuse to join.

Many Sudanese came to Egypt hoping to be resettled in the West, but that can take years and successful applications have plummeted since the January 2005 peace agreement…

This is what open borders leads to. This is also what refugee resettlement leads to. If you don’t want this in America, then the refugee resettlement programs have to be shut down.


This post was originally published on this site

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