Now it’s 11 foreign terrorists UK can’t throw out of the country

By benim
In Europe
Sep 29th, 2011
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Up to 11 convicted terrorists who should be deported are walking our streets, it emerged last night.

The Home Office confirmed that in at least seven of the cases the extremists are using human rights laws to thwart their removal.

They include fanatics linked to the failed July 21 bomb attack, Al Qaeda fundraisers and terrorist plotters.

Siraj Yassin Abdullah Ali was a supporter of the 21/7 attacks but said returning to Eritrea would breach his human rights
Ismail Abdurahman helped the 21/7 bomber and was released only a few weeks ago

Siraj Yassin Abdullah Ali, left, who was a supporter of the 21/7 attacks and Ismail Abdurahman, who helped the bombers, are reportedly on the list of suspects

The revelation that the total is 11 comes after the Daily Mail reported earlier this week how other foreign terrorists were planning to use human rights laws to dodge deportation.

It will fuel fears that Labour’s Human Rights Act and the European Court of Human Rights are making a mockery of British justice. All the terrorists are from countries which have poor human rights records – allowing them to claim they would face ill-treatment if sent back home.

Under Article 3 of both the European Convention on Human Rights, and the Human Rights Act, individuals are protected against torture, inhuman or degrading treatment.

The file of 11 names is compiled from Islamist Terrorism: The British Connections, a report by the Henry Jackson Society, the respected think-tank.

Family connection: A relative of Yeshi Osman, wife of 21/7 bomber Hassan Osman, is thought to be on the listFamily connection: A relative of Yeshi Osman, wife of 21/7 bomber Hassan Osman, is thought to be on the list

Researchers analysed court papers to produce a list of terrorists whose jail sentences are now complete and who the authorities have not confirmed have been deported.

Robin Simcox, research fellow at the Henry Jackson Society, said: ‘That the British Government is still unable to deport convicted foreign national terrorists is shameful.

‘When on the campaign trail, the Prime Minister said it was “disgraceful” and “crazy” that Britain was unable to deport foreign terrorists. Now he is in the position to actually do something about it, he must act immediately to correct Britain’s continued subservience to the European Convention on Human Rights.’

Home Office officials confirmed there are at least seven cases in which terrorists have served their time, been released from jail and are fighting deportation using human rights law.

They refused to identify the terrorists, but the Daily Mail understands they include July 21 bomb plot supporter Siraj Yassin Abdullah Ali, who says returning him to Eritrea would breach his human rights.

The Mail reported on Monday that he now mingles freely with the Londoners his co-plotters tried to kill in 2005. Ismail Abdurahman, who a few weeks ago was freed from jail for helping the bombers, is also on the list.

So too is Pakistani-born Gowthaman Jeyabalasingam, who caused mayhem at Blackpool Pleasure Beach with a hoax call threatening a nail bomb had been planted there.

The seven include at least one member of the Girma family – related to failed July 21 bomber Hussain Osman. Esayas and Mulu Girma – brother and sister of Osman’s wife, Yeshi – were handed ten-year jail terms for failing to inform police about the plot, and helping Osman to evade arrest.

The remaining freed terrorists on the Henry Jackson list are believed to either have leave to remain in Britain or are not currently going through the deportation process.

A Home Office spokesman said: ‘We believe any foreign criminal convicted of a serious terrorism-related offence should be removed from the UK at the earliest opportunity.

‘We are pursuing deportation against a number of individuals and will consider action against the rest towards the end of their sentences.’daily mail

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