South Africa: The state of our democracy

By IndepthAfrica
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Jul 29th, 2013
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Police surround the bodies of striking miners after opening fire on a crowd  at the Lonmin Platinum Mine near Rustenburg, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012. South African police opened fire Thursday on a crowd of striking workers at a platinum mine, leaving an unknown number of people injured and possibly dead. Motionless bodies lay on the ground in pools of blood.  (AP Photo)

Police surround the bodies of striking miners after opening fire on a crowd at the Lonmin Platinum Mine near Rustenburg, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012. South African police opened fire Thursday on a crowd of striking workers at a platinum mine, leaving an unknown number of people injured and possibly dead. Motionless bodies lay on the ground in pools of blood. (AP Photo)

By HASANIMA
Just freedom will prevail when we are one nation regardless of race, creed or ethnicity. There is no denial that South Africa is a multi -ethnic and racial country, which create a culture of superior complexity. This in itself creates a behaviour which is at odds with the democratic values which are enshrined in our constitution. When it comes to the provision of services African black people, be it professional or artisans , find it extremely hard to attract confidence from those of their European counter parts. The stereotype is also fed by our own fellow black Africans who believe that white is superior and black is inferior. The slave mentality theory.

Since the beginning of our history as a democratic nation we have been sowing seeds of racial inequality oblivious of the consequential damages this might have in the promotion of a just and equal society which we all want to live in. We seem to be burdening the future leaders with the kind of a world which is attainable in our own time and generation.

We should all stop being pretentious. For the past 20 years we have been engaged in endless discussion for change in our society without changing our mental status and attitude towards one another.

We cannot be engaged in a perpetual social intergration without making meaningful and genuine efforts towards our common objectives, which many have paid a huge sacrifice.

In order to achieve this goal in our life time, and as an honour to our ailing international icon , we need to some introspection of how far we have gone in living Mandela ‘s dream of none racial and prosperous society. We have had Moses in the person of Nelson, who had walked for 27 years from Egypt and delivered us to the promised land. It is encumbered upon us to settle comfortably in the promised land of democracy.

some may argue, rightfully so, that we need a political leadership which will help us realize that dream, but we have the political weapon in our hands to ensure that Mandela’s dream is realized without fail. No matter how long it will take us to overcome the inequalities created by the evil system of apartheid we need to make a valiant effort without compromise to achieving our common objectives. Those who have been living in comfort zones created by the legacy of apartheid may have to make some adjustment than being seen to be against these consequential imperatives.

There is no blinking at the fact that our people ‘s condition of poverty will need to be eradicated in order to create a peaceful and a prosperous society. We now live in a society that is, no doubt, characterised by violent crime that even the police are failing to abate it.

In the final solution , and because we live in the society of the fittest and I shudder to say, the political connected , we need to resolve we need to develop confidence in our fellow Africans and offer the necessary assistance in order to remove the stigma of false incompetence imposed upon them by the apartheid regime and colonialism. The general belief that Africans are incompetent has its manifestation in every field , be it engineering, medicine, law, accountancy , politics etc. The common belief is that we are only capable in providing labour under our former’s colonial master’s supervision. This is what who continue to benefit from the legacy of apartheid want us to believe regardless of our academic achievements in these fields.

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