The Socialist Nazi Sympathizing Jew Who Led the Left’s War on Israel

By IAfrica
In World News
Aug 9th, 2014
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Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.

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I wrote about Bruno Kreisky last year in the context of discussing Austria’s Islamization. There’s no doubt that Kreisky was a real demented piece of work, on a par with Norman Finkelstein or M.J. Rosenberg.

Austria’s Socialist Chancellor, Bruno Kreisky, despite being of Jewish ancestry, was fond of Muslim terrorists and Nazis. He had a habit of filling his cabinet with former Nazis while comparing Zionism to Nazism. His political success rested on a welfare state built with Soviet money funneled through commercial orders and turning a blind eye to terrorist attacks carried out with Soviet and Polish machine guns was part of the price.

Even though the two terrorists had shouted, “PLO”, Kreisky announced, “I am firmly convinced that the attackers had nothing to do with the PLO,” Instead he suggested that they had been out to sabotage “Palestinian interests.” During an interview, he offered that “the bad, unqualified treatment of Palestinians in Israel is one of the causes for these extreme actions.”

Joshua Muravchik has a much more extended write-up of that demented twisted creature whom he credits as “The Jew Who Turned the Left Against Israel”. I don’t think that’s a really accurate headline, as the core left was always anti-Zionist and anti-Semitic, long before Kreisky, but like the Finkelsteins and Rosenbergs, he was there to make the existing hatreds of the left seem “Kosher” again after the Holocaust.

The left’s support for Israel was a very temporary phenomenon that came about largely due to the political situation in Europe and as an early anti-colonialist opportunity. In a few cases bonds had been forged through the mutual resistance against the Nazis.

Kreisky however was a big fan of Nazis.

This framework shaped his attitude toward his Nazi fellow-prisoners when, in the mid 1930s, he served time for subversive activities under the authoritarian regime of Kurt Schuschnigg, which repressed challenges to the Austrian state from radicals, left and right. Kreisky’s biographer, H. Pierre Secher, writes that political discourse among these factions was “rarely . . . hostile.” On the contrary:

There was a well-founded solidarity among the political [prisoners], directed against the despised “cleric-fascist” government. … Ideologically, the distinction between “Sozis” [Socialists and] Commies on the one hand and Nazis on the other, was probably only the internationalism of the Marxists and the nationalism of the Nazis. In every other respect they agreed on the evils of capitalism. Even the primary connection by the Nazis of capitalism with the Jews did not necessarily encounter heated critical opposition from the Socialists.

Released by the Austrian authorities, Kreisky was arrested again after the Nazi takeover. He then sent an audacious letter to the Gestapo, somehow supposing that its officers would harbor sympathy for him. He wrote:

I [have] decided to direct my request directly to the Gestapo since I believe that organization now consists largely of former illegals; I am prepared to provide you any time with the names of currently prominent, well-known members of the NSDAP [Nazi Party] who can testify that during my time as [a] prisoner I have always shown solidarity toward my National Socialist prison mates.

It is possible to understand why in the 1930s Kreisky, like many other Socialists who were steeped in Marxism and viewed capitalists as the true enemies, might have seen Nazis as merely misguided revolutionaries. Back then, it was hard to know what exactly to make of Hitlerian rhetoric. But it is much harder to fathom how Kreisky could have clung to such a view after the Holocaust since most of his immediate relatives had been murdered in it. Yet he did.

It’s not really hard to fathom though because Kreisky hated Jews and, like most hard core leftist Jews, liked seeing them murdered. It’s what the USSR’s purges of Jews through the Jewish Section aka the Yevsektsia was built on.

Leftists are not Jews. They have always been the murderers of Jews. Their current collaboration with Hamas is nothing new.

Long before them, Bruno Kreisky was a Nazi collaborator.

Kreisky’s 1970 cabinet appointments sparked contention when the famous Austrian Nazi-hunter, Simon Wiesenthal, revealed that no fewer than four of the eleven ministers were former Nazis. Kreisky replied that no one, including those who had been Nazis, should be condemned for past political positions unless he or she could be shown to have committed a crime. He lashed out furiously at Wiesenthal calling him a “Jewish fascist,”

This is typical of the demented hypocrisy of the left, which allies with actual fascists, while calling its critics, “Fascists.”

In 1979, Kreisky took a further step, hosting Arafat in Vienna for talks with himself and West German Chancellor Willy Brandt on behalf of the Socialist International. The three leaders issued a joint communiqué blasting Israel, and at a concluding press conference, Kreisky likened the Palestinians’ situation to his own Swedish exile during World War Two, thereby, as Carl Gershman, the U.S. representative to the International, put it, embracing the PLO’s claim, that its “campaign against Israel [was] analogous to the European resistance against the Nazis.”

Whom Kreisky actually liked quite a bit. The Nazis that is.

Bruno Kreisky’s twisted brain isn’t that unusual. You can throw a rock at a JVP rally and come up with a dozen equally demented creatures. This is the mindset behind the persons of Jewish origin in the anti-Israel movement.


This post was originally published on this site

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